Lakota Noon: The Indian Narrative of Custer's Defeat


Lakota Noon: The Indian Narrative of Custer's Defeat Since I had visited the battlefield known as Custers last stand to the army and Battle on the Greasy Grass to the Indians, I was keen to read the Indian account of what happened I had picked up this book at the battlefield shop but didn t read it for five years.The author has used accounts given by Indian participants exclusively We see the historic victory of 1876 through their eyes He shows each stage of the battle with a map where the positions of warriors and cavalry are shown He dis Since I had visited the battlefield known as Custers last stand to the army and Battle on the Greasy Grass to the Indians, I was keen to read the Indian account of what happened I had picked up this book at the battlefield shop but didn t read it for five years.The author has used accounts given by Indian participants exclusively We see the historic victory of 1876 through their eyes He shows each stage of the battle with a map where the positions of warriors and cavalry are shown He discusses the different styles of fighting The soldiers stand in mass, firing in every direction The warriors fight a gorilla warfare, hiding in the coulies and waiting for opportunities to strike They run down any soldier who tries to escape The battle begins when the Indian camp is attracked in the morning It is a surprise attack leaving the Indians scrambling to find their war ponies and dress for battle They also need to evacuate the women and children Sitting Bull the great Hunkpapa war chief stays with the camp to exhort the warriors to brave up and to help the families escape Crazy Horse , the great Battle chief , leads many warriors and accounts label him as the bravest warrior on the field The battle rages all day in blinding heat The smoke and dust obscure everything Only the Indians have access to water and several times the soldiers try to break for the river but are repulsed There are accounts of soldiers shooting themselves in the head The Indians, becomingbattle hardened, begin to launch individual runs right into the midst of the soldiers Some die this way but the effect is to cause the soldiers to lose heart.Each individual account by a warrior is full of detail from his experience It makes a fastinating read The battle ends somewhere around six pm The last soldiers are killed on last stand hill Exactly who killed Custer is not resolved Most Indians said they had no idea he was there They wereinterested in the fine grey horses the troop rode This battle began the serious persecution of the tribes The were hunted down and killed or forced onto the reserves Only Sitting Bulls band held out by going to Canada Even that was a short respite From many standpoints I enjoyed this book It is a muchbalanced approached to the last stand of Custer, than others I have read I also like that the author brings in many cultural and contextual aspects of that moment in history It is fascinating to see how his approach in this brings a centering to that history Custer is neither the arrogant egoist that didn t listen to his scouts nor some kind of gallant, betrayed hero, fighting against overwhelming odds Additionally this book lends From many standpoints I enjoyed this book It is a muchbalanced approached to the last stand of Custer, than others I have read I also like that the author brings in many cultural and contextual aspects of that moment in history It is fascinating to see how his approach in this brings a centering to that history Custer is neither the arrogant egoist that didn t listen to his scouts nor some kind of gallant, betrayed hero, fighting against overwhelming odds Additionally this book lends real depth and shape to the amazing victory that the combined village of American Indians were able to achieve against Custer and his troops.The approach of the author is novel, in that he uses a chronological separation in 10 minute chunks, for each of the Indian participants The author also uses wide and varied sources, and discusses the discrepancies between original source material The presentation of individual narratives is such that the reader can read all of one individual s remembrances from beginning to end or read all the remembrances for a time frame After each timeframe the author stops to synopsis and delve into any contradictions This is the first work of its kind that focus on making sense of the tribal view of this history It has fascinating tidbits about some of my childhood favorites like Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull As well as the early years and formation of Black Elk In many of the overviews and histories about Little Big Horn the diversity of the nations gathered there at the river is glossed over There were mainly Lakota and Cheyenne, but even the Lakota were not from just one tribe, the gathering included Hunkpapa, Minneconjou, Oglala, Two kettle, Sans Arc and the Brul who were a sub unit of the Dakota Tetons There were also some unfortunate Arapaho youths who had actually just stopped by for the parties the night before and became embroiled in the battle This is a great book for historians, ethnographical linguist, social anthropologist and just anyone who would like a better understanding of the past and how that created the present Having read a plethora of Custer books, from the original Kick the Dead Lion and Custer s Luck to a variety ofrecent offerings, I find Michno s book refreshing and original This is a book devoted almost entirely to the Native American point of view of the LBH battle Having some personal experience with the LBH story, as well, having walked ridden the battlefield several times , it is clear to me that Michno does a good job of bringing the events and Sioux Cheyenne accounts into pers Having read a plethora of Custer books, from the original Kick the Dead Lion and Custer s Luck to a variety ofrecent offerings, I find Michno s book refreshing and original This is a book devoted almost entirely to the Native American point of view of the LBH battle Having some personal experience with the LBH story, as well, having walked ridden the battlefield several times , it is clear to me that Michno does a good job of bringing the events and Sioux Cheyenne accounts into perspective with thetraditional accounts of the whites He is able to take into account and realistically balance the often gray areas of memory and statements of events from both sides that took place almost 150 years ago O K., this is only my second Little Bighorn book, but I thought it was quite good and very different from Philbrick s book There isn t a lot of background, and of course no extensive discussion at all of all the infighting between Custer, Reno, Terry, etc this is about the Indians and told from their point of view But you do get a good appreciation of all the Indian tribes and the subgroups of the Lakota and their allies, and their relationships to each other The emphasis is on a blow O K., this is only my second Little Bighorn book, but I thought it was quite good and very different from Philbrick s book There isn t a lot of background, and of course no extensive discussion at all of all the infighting between Custer, Reno, Terry, etc this is about the Indians and told from their point of view But you do get a good appreciation of all the Indian tribes and the subgroups of the Lakota and their allies, and their relationships to each other The emphasis is on a blow by blow account of the battle from the Indians point of view It s broken down into chapters covering 10 minute segments, with an account from each of the Indians who was there including several women You really feel like you are doing history yourself The author does offer discussion and analysis, but you get the basic data the witnesses accounts themselves as well, so you can judge for yourself There is a lot of insight into the battle and how they saw it If you really want detail on the battle itself, this is quite good The maps do not outline troop movements, but do attempt to track each one of the Indian witnesses and where they saw what, and when I found myself constantly referring to the maps to figure out where Antelope or Fears Nothing were when they saw what they talked about So if you actually want to know about the three hours and some minutes leading up to the Last Stand, this is your book The author does time and motion analysis in order to sort out when things were happening on the battlefield He rejects a lot of myths about the battle, such as a lot of stories about Crazy Horse s actions, which just couldn t have happened in the time allotted though he was there and was a major participant Custer s attack really was a complete surprise to the Indians, and you get a strong impression that Custer was by no means walking into a trap or anything close The Indians beat off one attack from Reno as we know from other accounts but then face another group of soldiers attacking from another direction Custer as it turns out The outcome really looks doubtful for the Indians until about 2 3 of the way through, so you really get an idea of the suspense of the situation Also interesting was that the Indians did not even realize they had killed Custer until some time later This is an extremely well researched and well written book The story is told in a fascinating manner, tracing the movements of individuals in 10 minute increments This can be kind of confusing, but the discussion sections of each chapter tie everything together nicely It is not, however, for easy or casual reading I would high recommend it to military history buffs in addition to those interested in Native American history. I have to say this is by far the best account I have read of the battle The author uses the Native American accounts to describe the entire battle It does not cover the siege of Reno Only his initial attack That s actually where the book starts The book advances through the battle in 10 minute increments Each 10 minutes has a map with each participant, or eyewitness shown on the map, as well as their movements in that period While that method takes some getting used to on the readers pa I have to say this is by far the best account I have read of the battle The author uses the Native American accounts to describe the entire battle It does not cover the siege of Reno Only his initial attack That s actually where the book starts The book advances through the battle in 10 minute increments Each 10 minutes has a map with each participant, or eyewitness shown on the map, as well as their movements in that period While that method takes some getting used to on the readers part, I found that the book becameintense and the entire experience rose to a crescendo, when Custer and the remains of his command were overwhelmed Michno uses the archeological findings quite well to prove his points, but, the real starts are the participants While there are a few that had embellished their roles, the vast majority told a story of their actions, and what they saw, that was very plausible Most would tell you that they moved back or found cover if the firing was too hot I found it interesting how most wereinterested in preserving their life, rather than some feat of bravery Gone is the sweeping left hook of Crazy Horse with a thousand warriors, replaced by alikely gradual swelling of the NA ranks around the troops between Calhoun Hill and Last Stand Hill, till the numbers completely overwhelmed the cavalry soldiers, ending in their utter destruction.Gone too is the picture of Custer as a vain glory hound that recklessly attacked an enormous village Rather the picture emerges of a tactically able commander caught in a bad situation and let down by his subordinates.Gone is the image of a village the size of a small city with thousands of warriors numerically superior to Custer s command, and replaced with a number of warriors equivalent to Custer s command.Overall this is a fantastic book One that anyone with any interest in the iconic battle should read In Lakota Noon, the Indian participants of the Battle of the Little Bighorn tell their own story of that hot day in JuneThe author s innovative approach allows readers to follow the warriors onto the battlefield and see the fight through their eyes ➮ [Read] ➪ The Language of Music By Tom Brooks ➺ – Lavons.co.uk the Indian participants of the Battle of the Little Bighorn tell their own story of that hot day in JuneThe author s innovative approach allows readers to follow the warriors onto the battlefield and see the fight through their eyes An essential part of the LBH jigsaw which must be read by anyone who wants to understand what happened on that fateful June day in 1876 These, after all, are the only accounts by participants An essential text. Excellent Awesome book You can follow one warrior throughout the entire book or just read the entire book from different warriors perspectives A book to keep on your bookshelf for sure


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About the Author: Gregory F. Michno

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Lakota Noon: The Indian Narrative of Custer's Defeat book, this is one of the most wanted Gregory F Michno author readers around the world.